The Fall of Hadoop

With these and more shortcomings in the data science world, new tools such as Hive, Pig and Spark were created to work on top of Hadoop to overcome its weaknesses. But it simply couldn’t grow out of the shoes it had been made for.

future scope of Hadoop technology

The growth of NoSQL databases such as Hazelcast and MongoDB also meant that problems Hadoop was designed to support were now being solved by single players rather than the ‘all or nothing’ approach Hadoop was designed with. It wasn’t flexible enough to evolve beyond simply being a batch processing software.

Over time, new Big Data challenges began to emerge that a large monolithic software like Hadoop couldn’t deal with, either. Being primarily file-intensive, it couldn’t keep up with the variety of data sources that were now available, the lack of support for dynamic schemas, on-the-fly queries, and the rise of cloud infrastructure all caused people to seek different solutions. Hadoop had lost its grip on the enterprise world.

Businesses whose primary concern was dealing with Hadoop infrastructure like Cloudera and Hortonworks were seeing less and less adoption. This led to the eventual merger of the two companies in 2019, and the same message rang out from different corners of the world at the same time: ‘Hadoop is dead.’

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